Payroll for Employers

If you are one of the many people who had problems with your payroll in 2010 and wrestled with the calculation and submission of your 2010 P35, the good news is that the start of the Tax Year is the time to ensure that these problems do not reoccur in 2011. By putting a proper system in place at the start of the Tax Year, you will ensure that you avoid any of the problems associated with payroll as the year progresses. If on the other hand, you wish to enrage even the most timid of Employees you should make some mistakes in the calculation of their payslip. This is a sure-fire way to cause friction with your Employees. An Employee who thinks that he/she is being ‘done’ on their salary will not be a happy and productive part of your team.

The good news is that there are 2 possible solutions that we would recommend to this problem:

  1. Purchase some Payroll Software and learn how to use it properly. If you contact the office, we will be glad to recommend our preferred product. It is not expensive and does everything you will require from a payroll system. We also recommend that you take a training course in using the Payroll Software, regardless of which product you purchase. If you are new to payroll and purchase software without taking a training course, you may as well buy a printer and refuse to buy ink for it. It won’t work properly and will lead to both problems and frustration.
  2. Outsource your Payroll Services: As accountants, we believe that self-employed people should focus their energies on what they do best and find others to provide whatever other skills are required to run their business efficiently. At Robert King & Co we can offer a professional, cost-efficient payroll service to all Employers, regardless of size. We deal with all aspects of payroll from the calculation of payments to employees and the issue of payslips, to the submission of all Employers filing obligations with the Revenue Commissioners. Payslips can be issued in paper or in electronic format. We will also deal with the documentation of Employees who join or leave during the year. For a quotation, please don’t hesitate to contact the office.

Regardless of which option you choose, we cannot emphasise strongly enough the importance of using a proper system for your payroll. It will also ensure that your submissions to the Revenue are correct and will satisfy the requirements of any checks or audits you may be subjected to. Payroll is an essential component of the financial management of your business and without a great investment of time or money, it can run smoothly and without any headaches. Businesses have enough to worry about at the moment without adding to the list.

P60 and Income Levy Certificates

When an Employer finalises their 2010 P35 for submission to the Revenue Commissioners, they should also issue the 2010 P60 and Income Levy Cert to each employee who was on the payroll at year end. There is a legal obligation to issue both a P60 and an Income levy Cert to every Employee and these documents should be issued as soon as the P35 is completed. If you are using Payroll Software, a P60 and Income Levy Cert should automatically be generated as part of the Year End process.

A P60 shows the Gross Salary earned by each employee during 2010 and the amount of PAYE & Employees PRSI deducted, together with the class/ classes of PRSI paid by the Employee during the year. Total PRSI paid during the year is also shown and by deducting the Employees PRSI from this we get the amount of Employers PRSI paid during the year.

Any employees who were on the payroll at the start of 2010 but have left during the year will have received a P45 on leaving and will not receive a P60. For Employees who joined the payroll during 2010, their P60 should contain the total Gross Salary and Deductions for all employments during 2010, provided that the details of their previous employment were properly entered on the payroll system when they were added to your payroll. If you are unsure about this, you should check with your accountant.

Employers Year End Return (P35)

By now (January 25th 2011), Employers should have submitted their final P30 for 2010 to the Revenue Commissioners. This P30 was due to be received by the Revenue Commissioners no later than January 15th. Whilst some employers file Monthly P30s and some avail of certain exemptions that entitle them to the Quarterly P30 filing option, both groups were due to file their final P30 for 2010 in January 2011. Having filed these final P30s for 2010, the final Employers return that is required for 2010 is the 2010 P35 which must be received by the Revenue Commissioners on or before February 15th. Failure to file a P35 by the deadline will incur a penalty. This P35 Return is a summary of the entire payroll for the Employer for 2010 and is broken down by Employee to show:

  • Gross Salaries paid
  • PAYE deducted
  • Employees PRSI deducted
  • Any other deductions made from payroll, e.g. PRSAs
  • The PRSI Class(es) paid by each Employee during the year (commonly referred to as the ‘Stamp’)

The P35 Return also calculates the overall amount payable by an Employer to the Revenue Commissioners for 2010.  In theory, this should equal the amounts paid with the individual P30s that were submitted during 2010. If there is a shortfall, this payment must be submitted along with the 2010 P35 Return. This facility gives the Employer the opportunity to correct any errors that may have been made during the year. If you are using Payroll Software, the P35 will be automatically created for you as part of the Year End run. The most common errors in generating a P35 Return are incorrect or missing PPS numbers.

As mentioned earlier, there are penalties for those Employers who do not file their P35 by February 15th so you should ensure you do not miss this filing deadline. It is also worth noting that if there are any changes to the 2010 Payroll after the P35 has been paid, e.g. the payment of a Bonus, it is possible to file a revised P35 Return. This is known as a Supplementary P35.